Skiing Lines on Aoraki Mt Cook, NZ

As I peered over the ridge onto the massive Caroline Face of Aoraki / Mt Cook a barrage of snow and ice particles blasted into my face instantly freezing my nose. I ducked back into the shelter of the ridge and retraced my steps to Dave and Beau. It was obvious that today wasn’t the day for skiing a new line on the Caroline Face. We were stood at the top of a feature we dubbed Kingspine that butted onto the East Ridge. Cold bottomless powder awaited us below on the spine, hardly a consolation prize.

A few days before we had flown into the Plateau hut that is situated under the massive faces of Aoraki and Tasman. We stepped out the heli straight into -20C and a deep winter wonderland of bottomless powder. The hut offered shelter from the ferocious wind but not from the cold. Inside it was just above freezing which slowly crept into your bones during a sedentary storm bound day. As we readied to leave the next morning, I had delayed the inevitable final task of squeezing my feet into cold precision fit ski boots. It’s like plunging your feet into iced water and soon they were complaining about their new uncomfortable situation. Fortunately I had Lenz heat socks and after turning up the heat the pain subsided and I stopped worrying about my toes.

That first turn down the Kingspine was almost indescribable, slathering down its side, ultra cold over head blower drawing me into the white room. Cerebral circuits were going haywire with overload of sensory pleasure input. A series of turns followed flipping the spine from one side to the other as sluff poured down each side before going airborne. Midway I paused to let the sluff clear from my exit on the right face while I watched Dave rip the left face skiing gorgeous big turns.. Now it was my time to committ and run in front of the sluff, racing down the right, accelerating towards a choke, glancing over the shoulder to check the white dragon wasn’t catching up, and soaring out into the open slopes below. What an incredible first run in the zone, we were stoked and psyched for more.

A few days rolled by and the wind continued to blow hard but really it was the bottomless unconsolidated powder was the real issue, unclimbable and denying us the pleasure of getting on the big faces. Even on a 108 mm waist touring skis it was boot deep and you could push your pole in up to your shoulder. Dixon was the smallest, easiest and closest mountain to the hut and we made multiple unsuccessful attempts in the short weather windows that came about. One time I skinned over the bergshrund and levitated across the massive accumulation above only for Beau to fall in. On another day I fell in the bergshrund, climbed out and watched Dave fall in before we called it quits. Frustration mounted as a precious weather window was wasted. On my previous trip to NZ I’d made several attempts on Dixon and our high point remained the col before the wind buffeting made the decision to ski down easy. Sometimes its seems like its not your time to do certain routes.

Now it was time for Beau to leave on one of his soul ski missions and we wished him safe travels as he skied the 1000 m Freshfield Glacier en route to the head of the Tasman Glacier. This left us with less manpower for the bootpacks so we chose to use our previous track up Kingspine and ski off the opposite side into the Caroline Face. They say second time’s a charm and although breezy, it was possible to look down and study the face without the barrage of snow and ice stripping any exposed skin off your face. I cautiously sidestepped in over some neve using my ice axe and despite being on the windward side there was good compact powder on the face, perfect for steep skiing. A gorgeous curtain of snow several hundred metres wide hung below leading to the Caroline Glacier far below. In the background lay Lake Pukaki with its inviting the turquoise waters. I couldn’t imagine anywhere better to be right now.

There is always an element of tension, nerves and anxiety that comes with skiing big faces, especially when using a top down onsight style that yields no knowledge of the snow conditions below. None of these human emotions are conducive to an athlete performing at their best, but after we had skied a few turns and confirmed snow consistency, the tension dissipated, the mind and body centred and pure flow followed. One effortless turn followed another and all too soon were straight-ining out onto the Caroline Glacier. The skiing had gone by so quickly and we savoured the feeling from Anzac Peak’s South Col which offered a grandstand view of our line. As we sat out the wind in the warm sun eating a snack, a glorious wave of relaxation and satisfaction swept over me. A moment that will never be forgotten.

Back at the hut there had been some new arrivals, hovever the forecast was severals day of storm and our moral ebbed away with the thought of more long, cold, hut bound days, eating into our rationed provisions simply to alleviate boredom. Suddenly a girl popped her head round the door and said hi before disappearing off to unpack. A few minutes later she returned, but I was mistaken, this was a second girl. Suddenly there were 3 pretty girls there, things were looking up! Joking aside, we just needed people to speak to after a few intense days on our own. Claire, Erica, Suzie and Nick were part of a NZAC skills meet under the tutelage of the amiable and talented Kiwi guide Nick Craddock. In the evenings we played endless cardgames, swapped tall tales and laughed as noise of the wind forcing air through the window seals resembled the hoohoohooooo of an owl. They even shared their beer and wine with us for which we are eternally grateful. When we did our shopping I mentioned getting some Whiskey but Dave said he could manage without and I went along with it. I guess we had been hitting the beers hard in the village before we flew in and at the time taking a break seemed like a good idea!

We sat in the hut discussing what we could creatively conjure up backcountry cuisine wise from our dwindling supplies for dinner. It had become a pastime of mine and something to look forward as consecutive storms smashed into the Aoraki and Tasman. It sounds stupid now but it was a minor victory when I made a cheese toasting in a drying pan by capturing superheated steam under lid to melt the cheese before the bottom of the toast brunt. Sometimes it’s the little things you have to focus on.

The pitch of the wind outside would alternate as the wind increased from the haunting owl hoot to a roaring jet engine as the whole hut began to vibrate. A poster on the wall detailed all the huts in the region and one story in particular played on our minds. During a storm the Three Johns hut had broken free from its tie downs and carried over a kilometre down the mountain, tragically killing all within. That day we hadn’t even opened the door for fear of not being able to shut it against the wind. For a second I thought I heard something outside but put it down to my ears playing tricks and got on with cooking. But there it was again. That wasn’t ice falling off the roof. Something was outside.

Both of us rushed to open the hallway door and stood there in shock and disbelief. Two mountaineers covered in ice and looking exhausted sat next to the outside door. As we ate our dinner, they sat in their sleeping bags gorging on hot tea and told us their story. They had left the Ball shelter some 16 hours before and made the 1000 m ascent onto the Grand Plateau before taking some time to find the hut in the blizzard. Slowly colour returned to their faces and we went to bed happy they were ok.

At 4 am I woke up, opened my eyes and gazed up out the window to see the east face of Aoraki reaching up to stars. My senses took a second to register the change, silence, the jet engine was off. Quickly I put on all my clothes and packed my rucksac, lit the stove and went to wake Dave. Only in NZ can you have the all time conditions right after the worst storm imaginable and I wondered how Dave was going to get his head around that.

hey Buddy, its time to go for the East Face’

eh? what time is it”

430, let go dude’

We slipped out into the night moving silently and efficiently under our own torchlight attempting to make up some lost time of our late start due to the unexpected window. I was glad to be outside after days of storm, heading on an adventure. The 1200 m 45 to 50 degree East Face of Aoraki towered above us with a thick coating of powder. Ideally we would be starting skiing as the first rays of sun hit the face at dawn, before the sun started to heat the face. But NZ’s weather is fickle and opportunities scare. We’d just have to see how it went and ski down if it started to get warm.

In less than an hour we were swapping skis and skins for crampons and axes and crossing the bergshrund. As the sun rose above the mountains to our east, the face turned to gold. I pulled out my camera to capture such an incredible moment but the battery instantly failed. It was really cold and I was not relishing submerging my feet in the snow which would be some ten degrees colder than the air. Breaking trail up bottomless snow was going to be the physical crux of the day with only two if us to share the work. I turned my axes to create as big a footprint as possible then pushing down hard with my arms took maybe 30 kilos off my feet meaning they only went in knee deep. We swapped leads every 1/2 hour while the other would eat, drink and draft in the slip-steam.

While we climbed, thin cloud had veiled the sun and keeping the temperature low, but now as we approached the junction of top of the face and the summit light started to go flat due to thicker cloud. Not a problem for climbing but you need to see the surface of the snow to be able to ski fast. We debated whether to tag the summit or ski. I’d climbed Aoraki before and both of us were psyched for a good ski after 5 hours climbing so we cut out a ledge and swapped crampons for skis. Strangely as we climbed higher the snow had become deeper with no wind effect, there was going to be a lot of stuff that would build and build until a full born avalanche tore down the face and we certainly needed to avoid getting caught up in that at all cost. Ideally there would have been less new snow for steep skiing but we were there now.

Dave set off getting that all important first turn out of the way as muscles and coordination adapted from hours of climbing to skiing. Its like a triathlon transition except here high on the mountain a mistake won’t go unpunished. As I waited to ski I couldn’t help but take in the scale and beauty of my surroundings with the Plateau hut 1500 m below, and another 1000 m below that, the gigantic Tasman Glacier stretched for 15 km to the main divide of Elie de Beaumont and Hochstetter Dome. To the east lay the Murcheston and Godley valleys with several lifetime’s worth of ski adventures.

Now it was my turn and I was acutely aware of the stuff tugging my skis which in turn increased the nerves. After a couple of pitches our minds started to relax and in turn our energy levels soared. The light also improved and now we were able to ski luscious big flow turns in a near effortless manner. We dropped hundreds of metres in seconds and soon we were at the bottom, pumping fists, gasping for air, laughing and admiring the face.

That night at the hut we eagerly listened to weather bulletin over the radio. The high pressure was holding but severe gale on the tops. I really wanted to ski another line on the Caroline Face but it needed calm conditions. The obvious choice was to try and make the second descent of the Bowie Couloir which had first been skied in 2012 by Andreas Fransson and Magnus Kastengren. The alarm tore us from deep sleep and at 430 am we stole away into the dark. It’s easy to think about all the bad things about getting up early and going out into the cold dark, but I like to focus on the coming dawn and the sun returning bringing back warmth, light and energy to the world. This would be a dawn that was impossible to forget as the sky turned gold, pink, orange and blue. We watched it unfold in awe unwilling to miss a moment as the colours changed, but we knew time was pressing us to get on with the task at hand. Reluctantly we put our cameras away and continued up the glacier roped together only to find a huge crevasse barring our way. We donned crampons and with Dave belaying me I managed to climb down and span to the other side where I sunk my tools into neve. With my heart in my mouth I shouted ‘watch me’ as I committed to pulling on my axes and climbing up the far wall. I quickly constructed a buried ice anchor and belayed Dave safely across. Only the bergshrund lay between us and the Bowie Couloir and we could see a good snowbridge. It seemed the difficulties were behind us.

The sun was much stronger today and suddenly a large stuff released from high on the mountain and channeled down the choke between the ice and the rock where we needed to go. Dave’s psyche to continue was dwindling unless we found a safe way to proceed and it was difficult to see if there was anything else high on the mountain that could come down. Finally I suggested climbing up on the left using the serac as a shield. At least we could make some turns from there and if nothing else came down we could sprint up the choke to the next safe zone. We made quick progress to the serac and since the mountain had continued to be quiet I kept going through the choke with my heart rate nearly at max. As I caught my breath Dave joined me and we made swift progress to the junction with Zurbriggens Ridge and gazed out across the East Face.

It was such a cool spot to hang out, enjoy some food and savour the surroundings, knowing a gorgeous descent on perfect powder awaited below. This would be the last skiing on our trip and I knew it would be great. This time the honours were mine and I set of skiing fast open turns on sensational snow down to the spur on top of the serac. Dave’s sluff would be channeled away from me down the choke so I was safe to film him skiing. A few controlled turns took me through the choke and out onto the lower apron which was a dream to ski, heading down diagonally left to right away from the stuff and not a care in the World. All too soon we were back on the glacier, stoked to have pulled off the best skiing of the trip despite all the obstacles in our path on the way up. Sam Smoothy said to me ’New Zealand can be a cold mistress sometimes,’ but boy you are in for some ride when she does eventually warm to you.

Ross Hewitt at Hooker lake Aoraki / Mount Cook NZ by Dave Searle
Waiting it out in the valley spending amongst the stunning scenery time walking and trail running while the wind and storms raged in the mountains. 📸Dave Searle
Beau Fredlund Sealy Tarns in November 2019 NZ by Ross Hewitt
It’s the equivalent of  May in the Northern Hemisphere and for only the 3rd in the season it snows to the valley floor. Beau Fredlund at dawn on way to ski near Mueller Hut 📸Ross Hewitt
Sefton after November snowfall Aoraki Mount Cook range NZ by Ross Hewitt
Mt Sefton 📸Ross Hewitt
Dave Searle Aoraki Mount Cook and Mueller lake NZ by Ross Hewitt
Dave Searle skiing with Aoraki and Mueller Lake in background 📸Ross Hewitt
avalanche on Silberhorn, Aoraki Mt Cook range
After a week of storm and heavy precip the faces were loaded up with snow. A small piece of ice triggered a slab that went airborne and just fell short of our skin track. Certainly D4 📸R Hewitt
Ross Hewitt with East Face Aoraki Mount Cook and Silberhorn Lendenfield in NZ
Me with Aoraki, Silberhorn, Tasman, Lendenfield, Haast, Dixon 📸Ross Hewitt
Dave Searle on the Kingspine, Silberhorn in back ground, Aoraki / Mt Cook
Dave Searle in bottomless snow on the Kingspine 📸Ross Hewitt
Ross HeDave Searle POV of Ross Hewitt skiing kingspine of Aoraki Mount Cook NZ
Ross Hewitt at the top of Kingspine ready to ski 📸Dave Searle
ski tracks by Ross Hewitt with East Face of Aoraki Mount Cook NZ behind
Ephemeral signatures, a brief moment in time and history, erased as quickly as they were made but never forgotten 📸Ross Hewitt
Silberhorn Tasman Lendenfield Malte Brun Aiguille Rouge by Ross Hewitt
Panorama of Grand Plateau and Tasman Valley 📸Ross Hewitt
Ross HeDave Searle POV of Ross Hewitt skiing First Descent on Caroline Face of Aoraki Mount Cook NZ
Myself and Dave about to drop into the Caroline Face from the East Ridge 📸Dave Searle
Ross Hewitt a POV and Dave Searle skiing First Descent on Caroline Face of Aoraki Mount Cook NZ
Established on Caroline Face & great snow for steep skiing with not too much sluff 📸R Hewitt
Ross Hewitt a POV and Dave Searle skiing First Descent on Caroline Face of Aoraki Mount Cook NZ
Great skiing on the skier’s left side of Caroline Face 📸Ross Hewitt
Ross Hewitt after skiing a new line on the Caroline Face of Aoraki / Mount Cook NZ by Dave Searle
Our line on the Caroline Face skied top down accessed from the East Ridge 📸Dave Searle
Dave Searle on the East Face of Aoraki / Mt Cook photo Ross Hewitt
Dave Searle on trail breaking duty on Aoraki / Cook’s East Face. The day after it would be skied by 14 people who got the benefit of our track, surely a pivotal moment in the history of NZ big mountain skiing? 📸Ross Hewitt
Dave Searle skiing on the East Face of Aoraki / Mt Cook by Ross Hewitt
Dave Searle on the East Face 📸R Hewitt
Dave Searle skiing East Face of Aoraki / Mount Cook by Ross Hewitt
Dave Searle on the East Face with the Tasman Glacier and Elie de Beaumont beyond 📸R Hewitt
Ross Hewitt skiing East Face of Aoraki / Mount Cook NZ by Dave Searle
Better light now and a chance to ride fast. 📸 Dave Searle
Malte Brun at dawn by Ross Hewitt
Sunset over Malte Brun
Ross Hewitt approaching the Bowie Couloir Aoraki / Mount Cook at night by Dave Searle
Heading out into the cold dark night is often rewarded with incredible sunrises. 📸 Dave Searle

 

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Me watching the sunrise in awe. 📸 Dave Searle
First Rays of sun from Aoraki Mount Cook NZ by Ross Hewitt
First warming rays warming us to the task ahead 📸 Ross Hewitt
Ross Hewitt approaching the Bowie Couloir of Aoraki / Mount Cook in NZ by Dave Searle
Me weighing up options as a huge crevasse bars access to the couloir 📸 Dave Searle
Ross Hewitt in Bowie Couloir Aoraki / Mount Cook NZ by Dave Searle
Using the serac to shield us from sluffs coming through the choke on the right 📸 Dave Searle
Dave Searle in Bowie Couloir of Aoraki / Mount Cook NZ by Ross Hewitt
Searle in the choke sprinting to me to get out the sluff firing line 📸 Ross Hewitt
Ross Hewitt in Bowie Couloir Aoraki / Mount Cook NZ by Dave Searle
Happy days above the serac and out of the sluff line with easy ground to the col with Zurbriggen Ridge 📸 Dave Searle
Ross Hewitt after skiing Bowie Couloir Aoraki / Mount Cook NZ by Dave Searle
Stoked to have finally skied the Bowie Couloir in sensational conditions 📸 Dave Searle
Sunrise on Aoraki / Mount Cook and Tasman by Ross Hewitt
Panorama of Aoraki / Mt Cook and Tasman at dawn 📸 Ross Hewitt
Tasman NZ at dawn by Ross Hewitt
Tasman at dawn. Climbing this beast and skiing the Syme Ridge on the right is high on my to do list but extremely difficult to get safe climbing conditions and snow to ski 📸 Ross Hewitt
Aoraki / Mount Cook NZ by Ross Hewitt
Aoraki and its mighty east face at dawn. The crevasse that caused us some problems going to Bowie is visible just above the shade line.  📸 Ross Hewitt
sunrise over Aiguille Rouge Chudleigh Nathan by Ross Hewitt
Worth getting out of bed at 0330 hrs to see this? Every god damned time! And no this isn’t photoshopped 📸 R Hewitt
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Time for a swim at Sumner beach
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Surfers enjoying the swell
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Malakai watching

 

 

 

 

New Zealand – a film about skiing on Aoraki

In the words of Sam Smoothy ‘sometimes New Zealand can be a cold hearted mistress.’ She was certainly giving us the ultimate in cold shoulder treatment as day after day the South Island got battered by storm force winds as much as 75 mm of precip. The Wyn Irwin hut near Mount Cook village provided us with friendly and cosy refuge. Amongst the temporary residents were the guardian Cam Mulvey, Laura from the DOC Kia Preservation Project, Aussie Tim who was on the Plateau hut build team, Eifel from Singapore and Beau Fredlund from Yellowstone and endless banter passed the time and kept spirits high. It was a chance to adjust to the 12 hour time change, clear the mind and focus on what lay ahead, and do some trail running surrounded by the lakes and glaciers of the rugged Hooker valley.
Back in June Smoothy and myself had started talking about collaborating on some ski projects in the Southern Alps but a dry August had me holding back from buying a airline ticket. Finally in September the snow came and when I saw some activity in the mountains I pressed the button on a ticket. After beating around the bush for a while swapping messages we got to the point and started discussing a new line on the 1400 m Caroline Face. This had seen its first descent in 2017 by Grant, Mosetti and Briggs, a trip I had to pull out of at the last moment due to herniating the lowest disc in my spine onto the sciatic nerve root. A big glaciated face like this changes from season to season and when the door on one line closes others may open. To put it in context the West Face of Mont Blanc is similar in size and holds 4 independent ski routes which are rarely all in condition simultaneously. Since skiing 1000 m + faces is in powder is my thing, I still had an interest in the Caroline Face and the opportunities it holds for skiers. That said it pays to be careful who you speak to outside of the steep skiing fraternity as it makes the uninitiated uncomfortable as their pulse quickens, the blood drains from their face and they stare at your through glazed over eyes as if you are crazy. Its just a question of what you are used to and my last runs in my backyard where Couturier, Mallory and the ultra tech steep and exposed Aiguille du Plan North Face. In Chamonix anything is possible but in NZ you need one day when you won’t be ripped off the mountain by then wind catching the skis on your pack. Doesn’t sound like too much to ask right?
I was all set to fly solo, relishing the chance to do my own thing after a busy guiding summer. So it was a surprise bonus when Dave Searle asked what I was up to and bought a ticket too.
The breaks in the weather were small this spring, mainly too short to make a valley approach and ski the next day and It seemed unlikely there would be sufficiently weather window to make it worthwhile for local Smoothy to hook up. So when we saw a tiny couple hour window we jumped at the opportunity to fly into Plateau hut joined by Yellowstone resident and ski guide Beau Fredlund to get amongst the skiing. We landed there in -20C and bottomless powder that was going to make getting up anything a challenge. Here’s what we got up to.

Film – Skiing lines on Aoraki, Mt Cook, NZ

A short film of Ross Hewitt and Dave Searle skiing lines on Aoraki Mount Cook 2019 including a new line on the Caroline Face, a descent of the East Face in deep powder and the second descent of the Bowie Couloir after Andreas Fransson and Magnus Kastengren’s descent in 2012.

In the words of Sam Smoothy ‘sometimes New Zealand can be a cold hearted mistress.’ She was certainly giving us the ultimate in cold shoulder treatment as day after day the South Island got battered by storm force winds as much as 75 mm of precip. The Wyn Irwin hut near Mount Cook village provided us with friendly and cosy refuge. Amongst the temporary residents were the guardian Cam Mulvey, Laura from the DOC Kia Preservation Project, Aussie Tim who was on the Plateau hut build team, Eifel from Singapore and Beau Fredlund from Yellowstone and endless banter passed the time and kept spirits high. It was a chance to adjust to the 12 hour time change, clear the mind and focus on what lay ahead, and do some trail running surrounded by the lakes and glaciers of the rugged Hooker valley.

Back in June Smoothy and myself had started talking about collaborating on some ski projects in the Southern Alps but a dry August had me holding back from buying a airline ticket. Finally in September the snow came and when I saw some activity in the mountains I pressed the button on a ticket. After beating around the bush for a while swapping messages we got to the point and started discussing a new line on the 1400 m Caroline Face. This had seen its first descent in 2017 by Grant, Mosetti and Briggs, a trip I had to pull out of at the last moment due to herniating the lowest disc in my spine onto the sciatic nerve root. A big glaciated face like this changes from season to season and when the door on one line closes others may open. To put it in context the West Face of Mont Blanc is similar in size and holds 4 independent ski routes which are rarely all in condition simultaneously. Since skiing 1000 m + faces is in powder is my thing, I still had an interest in the Caroline Face and the opportunities it holds for skiers. That said it pays to be careful who you speak to outside of the steep skiing fraternity as it makes the uninitiated uncomfortable as their pulse quickens, the blood drains from their face and they stare at your through glazed over eyes as if you are crazy. Its just a question of what you are used to and my last runs in my backyard where Couturier, Mallory and the ultra tech steep and exposed Aiguille du Plan North Face. In Chamonix anything is possible but in NZ you need one day when you won’t be ripped off the mountain by then wind catching the skis on your pack. Doesn’t sound like too much to ask right?

I was all set to fly solo, relishing the chance to do my own thing after a busy guiding summer. So it was a surprise bonus when Dave Searle asked what I was up to and bought a ticket too.

The breaks in the weather were small this spring, mainly too short to make a valley approach and ski the next day and It seemed unlikely there would be sufficiently weather window to make it worthwhile for local Smoothy to hook up. So when we saw a tiny couple hour window we jumped at the opportunity to fly into Plateau hut and get amongst the skiing. We landed there in -20C and bottomless powder that was going to make getting up anything a challenge. Here’s what we got up to.

sKiwiland – Going Big Down Under in New Zealand

Kiwiland. Snowy ridges and elegant ice aretes. Big wild mountains with hard core, ever changing access thats probably more difficult and way scarier than most routes. Out of date guide books and maps that don’t reflect what climate change has done. Limited beta and history held in the minds of a few in the know. Rapidly changing weather and wind, wind that has picked up huts and killed all those sheltering within. The latest Plateau hut is rated to 400 kph. One night there I got up to pee and was greeted by a scene from Hell freezing over with a raging ice storm. Hostile. It took everything I had to get the hut door shut. It always takes me a while to adapt back to weather thats akin to Scotland’s wildest winter storms. My local mountain range Cairngorm clocked 315kph in 2009. November in the Alps is slightly chilly in the morning followed by a 18C afternoon of sunshine with no wind. All very civilised and benign. A couple of days a month it might precip or have a breeze necessitating something other than a thin softshell.

That said, once you get to grips with taking advantage of the weather windows, New Zealand has such a unique, spectacular, rugged and colourful landscape that will have you check yourself several times a day and wonder how that was formed. It also snows nearly 3 times what the Alps get these days and you will have the mountains to yourself to explore and do as you please. The mountains are also bad ass with a plethora of faces bigger than 800 m and all the features you could imagine, spines, faces, couloirs, and glaciers.

Tom Grant and myself spent 3 weeks exploring and ski mountaineering there. We skied about 15 days in total despite waiting for lost bags for 2 days at the start of the trip and dealing with a blown van engine another day. The skiing we did varied from low angled glacier bumps on perfect corn to getting committed climbing and skiing a couple of 1st descents on sight with the common theme being adventure skiing. You never knew what you’d get or what the weather would actually be.  It definitely ranks up there in my all time trips and wouldn’t have been possible without the help of some of my friends down there who we owe alot; Evan Cameron, Niki Begg, Mel Money, and Cam Mulvey.

 

An hour off the plane and Evan has us at Jane Fonda’s Work Out Wall
New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-2-3

Hiding from the gales. Evan in The Cave, Port HillsNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-3-3

A fisherman on Lake Tekapo. Gales prevent us driving over 80 kphNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-2

 

Trip 1 – Sefton Biv

Sou Westers still hammer over the divide, pinning the cloud. Low chances
New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-4-2Mueller lake en route to Sefton Biv hoping to dodge the rain
New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-5-2The wind buffeting Tom causing him to stagger as if he’d had a few too manyNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-6-2On the bluffs below Sefton Biv. The moraines testamont to what once wasNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-7-2Tom near Sefton Biv as the wind continues to hammer us with gusts
New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-3Sefton Biv – you really don’t want t to slip hereNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-4Enjoying a hot drink in Sefton BivNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-5En route to Footstool with Sefton Biv in the backgroundNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-6Skinning on the Te Waewae GlacierNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-7A chance to take in the unique landscape laid out below us
New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-8About to drop into the what Cam has dubbed the ‘Fransson line’New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-9Setting up to shootNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-10Tom in the ‘Fransson line’New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-11Aoraki Mt Cook, Nazomi, Pibrac, Ball pass, Hooker lakeNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-13Lenticulars over Aoraki Mt Cook denoting strong winds at altitudeNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-15Tom taking it all inNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-14Sunset on the south face of Aoraki Mt CookNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-16Aorkai Mt Cook and Godley Valleys across Lake PukakiNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-17Hanging out at Peters Lookout for a sundown beerNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-18Sefton and FootstoolNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-19

 

Trip 2 – Plateau Hut

Adam Fabrikant and Bill Hass psyched to get goingNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-20Jumping into the Porter ski plane. High wind at Grand Plateau soon has us transfer to a chopperNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-21Approaching plateau hut and the classic east face of Aoraki Mt Cook New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-22Noah Howell and Beau Fredlund of team Voile USANew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-24Billy, Adam and Tom under the East Ridge of Aoraki Mt CookNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-25Cinerama ColNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-27Tasman, Lendenfield, Haast, Dixon and HaidingerNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-28A late afternoon weather lull allows us to get some turns off the knoll near Anzac Peak
New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-29Returning to the hut. We decided to ski the mini-golf 700 m line just left of the sun-shade line off the East ridge at some point. Everything is dwarfed under the massive east face of Aoraki Mt CookNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-30Skinning with Silberhorn in the backgroundNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-31Adam Fabrikant, Bill Haas and Noah Howell crossing the shrund at Zurbriggen’sNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-32Beau Fredlund at the start of Zurbriggen’s which was our entry to the east faceNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-33Dawn hues over the Grand PlateauNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-34The start of the treadmill on Aoraki Mt Cook’s east face. Beau Fredlund, Billy Haas and Adam FabrikantNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-35Sunrise over the Aiguille RougeNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-36The summit ridge of Aoraki Mt Cook on fire in the morning lightNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-37Sunrise. Anzac Peak mid shotNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-38Beau Fredlund traversing over ice high on the east faceNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-39Good Cold Chalk on the east face. I skied from a point a bit below the others as with a heavy cold and fever I didn’t need to summit again!

New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-1-2High wind at altitudeNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-40Heading for the east ridge and some shelter from the windNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-41Climbing a subsidiary ridge to the east ridgeNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-42We followed this little spine to the junction with the east ridge of Aoraki Mt CookNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-43Approaching the east ridge. Fine ski mountaineeringNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-44Climbing up towards the east ridgeNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-45700 m of sweetness belowNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-46The moon over Malte BruneNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-47Aoraki Mt Cook’s east face in the moonlightNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-48

Tasman in the moonlightNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-49Plateau hut in the moonlightNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-50Chudleigh in the moonlightNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-51Resourcefulness. A chess set made from plastic tubing with a quizzboard on Kiwi AlpinismNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-52Passing the time at Plateau hut while the wind blows New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-53Tom avoiding the rollerballs as the snow gets greenhoused in the cloudNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-54A sneaky shortcut to the Boys moraine?New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-56A brief break in the weather allows us out for some turnsNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-57Helmet on for the walk out. The looseness of makes my stomach tightenNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-58Tom scree running below the Boys Glacier. Ankles suitably batteredNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-59Safely? on the flat Tasman and dealing with the next Jenga pile of choss. Flying in and out is a worth every pennyNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-60After 7 hours of moraine warfare we are an hour away from the road head. My Ipod was essential for the mindless soldier style route march with a 50lb backpack. We could remember if the streams held giardia and without purification tablets went dry for the last 3 hours. New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-61Greg Child once said of his ice axe ‘the fuckin fuckers fuckin fucked’. Same could be said for either of us. Our next walk out was worse and a couple of hours longer. New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-62

A throwback to an era when they could get the bus up to the 100 person Ball Lodge to ski up there. The moraine collapse has made access a whole different game.New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-63

 

Trip 3

Our preferred method of accessing the mountains New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-64Tasmin lake and the Caroline FaceNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-65Moraines amid moraine. Maybe a hang over from the 1991 mega rockfall when 12 million cubic metres fell off down the east face to the Tasman glacierNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-66Tom and myself back in the zone at Tasman saddle hutNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-67Negotiating crevasses on route to Elie de BeaumontNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-68Tom on the 1st descent of Right Flank, West Face of Elie de BeaumontNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-69Descending into the cloud on Elie’s West FaceNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-70Elie de Beaumont’s Right Flank is the snow covered slab mid shotNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-71Elie de Beaumont’s west face with our lineEllie copyThe spine gave us safe passage out of the cloud near the divide and down onto the Tasman GlacierNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-73We made it back from the unknown on the wild west sideNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-76An afternoon corn run on the Hochstetter DomeNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-77Islands in a sea of cloudsNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-78Chilling in the afternoon sun at Tasman Saddle hut
New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-79Sundown over Aoraki and HorokoauNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-80Dinner timeNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-81Aoraki Mt Cook, Tasman and Minarets
New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-82Sunrise on the MinaretsNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-83Beau Fredlund harvesting some sweetcorn on Mt Hamilton
New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-85I skied this lush couloir on Hamilton solo. Anyone know if its been skied before?New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-120

We convened at Darwin corner with the Voile team and 10 mins after making a satphone call the air taxi came to collect us

New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-86Flyover the Hochstetter Ice fallNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-87

Drying kit outside the Wyn Irwin, pretty much the only day it was warm
New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-88Mt Sefton and Footstool
New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-89A rare windfree coffee morning New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-90Our van’s engine blew a couple of cylinder heads en route to Wanaka so after a tow to the nearest town and and afternoon waiting for a new van we ended up in a lay by in the back end of…New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-91

Tom enjoying beer and curry. He eats slower than a tortoise so I’d usually finished, done the washing up and gone to bed before he had chewed his first mouth-full.New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-92Van life. Tom catching up on his sleep. This gives the impression it was quite tidy. In reality we were endlessly rummaging round looking for stuff. We head back to Mount Cook Village for a final tripNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-93New Zealand spring and snow down to 900 mNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-94

 

Trip 4 – Tasman Saddle Hut

Heli-waiting at the airport. 1000 hrs – standby boys. Drink more coffee. 1200 hrs – super standby. Eat a sandwich and drink more coffee. 1500 hrs – looking good boys – standyby. Final coffee. Caffeine poisened. 1800 hrs – come back tomorrow for another exciting day in the airport carpark
New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-95

 

Mt Sefton and FootstoolNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-96Sharing a flight with NZ backcountry splitboarder Shane Orchard and skier Ryan TaylorNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-97The ski plane departs under Mt Green and WalterNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-98We skied this line on Mt Abel after climbing Pencil Dick Gully and traversing the ridgeNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-99Tom climbing Pencil Dick GullyNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-100Me traversing over the summit of Mt Abel New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-101Finding our lineNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-102

Tom dropping inNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-103SweetcornNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-104HalfwayNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-105Rippin some corn in the bowls behind the hutNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-106The ski line for the 1st descent of Mount Darwin’s south faceNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-84Lush morning light as we start to climb
New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-107Approaching the summit ridge
New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-108Hanging out for a few hours waiting for the sun to come onto the upper pitchNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-109Looking down the ski lineNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-110First turn
New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-111Start of the second pitch down past the upper seracNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-112Before the traverse
New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-113Freeride over to the spurNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-114Heavy wet snow on the spur needing careful negotiationNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-116Sticking to the apex of the spineNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-117Approaching the lower rocky cruxNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-118The foreshortened face from belowNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-119Skiing out. High winds preventing flying and bad weather threatening
New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-121An abandoned tracked tractor on the white ice of the Tasman glacier. In the 1970s the ski planes didn’t have as much power and sometimes needed a tow New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-122Every kilometre skied on the white ice was a kilometre less to walk with the additional weight of skis and boots on my pack which was already heavy by euro standards. In the end I must have skied 4 of the 5 km of white iceNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-123Off the easy going white ice and into the rubble. Thankfully its overcast and the rock is not reflecting heatNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-124Getting hotter as the sun comes out and we get baked in the moraineNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-125About 5 hours of staggering around on rubble after leaving the white ice. We left the hut with a couple of litres each and drank another couple shortly after this section. Only 7 km to go but hands (from poling for stability) and feet are raw and roasting.  Thanks to the Irishman who gave us a lift from Blue Lakes to the airport to collect our car.New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-126Moody weather as we head towards ChristchurchNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-127New Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-128Tom discovering the almost unique style at Castle HillNew Zealand skiing Ross Hewitt Tom Grant-129